Soliloquy of the spanish cloister analysis

Water your damned flower-pots, do!

Soliloquy of the spanish cloister analysis

This essay was formatted and submitted for Mr. When artfully used, it can be a true indicator of heightened emotion. In this sense, rage means not only violent anger but extreme intensity as well. Therefore, many different emotions can reveal themselves in the guise of rage. Yet, while both works play off rage, the first poem deals with an expression of hatred where the second is mainly a discourse of shock.

Therefore, the paths that rage takes in these works are different. Leading the poems along these differing paths is a wide range of structural devices such as lists, punctuation, and stanzaic construction as well as a rich variety of images, comparisons, and intonations.

As a whole, these forms and their functions determine the nature of the works. In fact, his soliloquy is mainly a fit of rage brought on by this deeply rooted hatred. The very structure of the work reveals this hatred.

The poem is arranged as a pair of lists, each with its own function. After a brief opening where the narrator reveals his bitter feelings, he presents a list of grievances against the hated Brother Lawrence.

His grievances are petty, ranging from indignation at the way Lawrence speaks of his flowers 5 to the brother's frivolous table conversation to his suspected lechery and poor table manners The first list is disturbing, but it is nothing compared to the second list. The speaker should be a religious man, but here he explores several paths to damnation to which he would expose Lawrence His internal nature is the complete opposite of his external appearance.

These lists give an important clue to the narrator's mental state. It takes time to compose lists and even more time to organize them. Yet the speaker has both lists readily available to release in his bitter outburst.

This indicates an enduring hatred and not a passing annoyance. He hates Lawrence to the bone for reasons that seem frivolous to an outside observer. It is this hatred that his rage works off of.

The punctuation of the poem emphasizes the strength of his feelings. Exclamation points are common such as in the narrator's many caustic explosions aimed at Lawrence. There his lily snaps! Another telling form of punctuation is the question mark. As with the exclamation point, it occurs throughout the poem.

However, in this poem, the question marks are interesting in that they are usually not used to ask a question but to heighten sarcasm. His real aim is to ridicule and to express his disgust.

The question marks serve to give the reader a thin disguise of his feelings. The closeness of the two marks of punctuation is most clear when they are used together.

Soliloquy of the spanish cloister analysis

This sarcasm emphasizes the deep hatred of the speaker for Lawrence. Sarcasm is expressed in other ways as well. For example, the narrator often uses the first-person plural when speaking of Lawrence: We'll have our platter burnished, Laid with care on our own shelf!

With a fire-new spoon we're furnished, And a goblet for ourself. However, the "we" form makes it seem as if he has such knowledge.

The speaker uses this supposed knowledge against Brother Lawrence, providing more fodder for his lists of hatred. Considering that the narrator's rage is founded purely on a carnal emotion such as hatred, one can easily think of him as an animal.Soliloquy of the Spanish Cloister Robert Browning.

Gr-r-r—there go, my heart’s abhorrence! Water your damned flower-pots, do!

Soliloquy of the spanish cloister analysis

If hate killed men, Brother Lawrence. The peculiar essence of the poem "Soliloquy of the Spanish Cloister" written by Robert Browning lies in the impression of violent and disordered hatred.

This feeling is revealed by the very structure of the work. The poem "Soliloquy of the Spanish Cloister" is written in nine stanzas and is narrated by an unnamed Spanish monk who watches in hatred and envy as Brother Lawrence waters plants.

The entire poem is spoken by the monk to himself. Just as in "Soliloquy of the Spanish Cloister," Tennyson's "Locksley Hall" reveals a speaker who is bound by rage.

Yet the second poem contains a crucial difference. The narrator takes on many, disorganized fits of emotion as opposed to one organized fit in Browning's poem. I. Gr-r-r-there go, my heart's abhorrence! Water your damned flower-pots, do! If hate killed men, Brother Lawrence, God's blood, would not mine kill you!

What? your myrtle-bush wants trimming? The peculiar essence of the poem "Soliloquy of the Spanish Cloister" written by Robert Browning lies in the impression of violent and disordered hatred. This feeling is revealed by the very structure of the work.

The poem is framed by bestial growl at first word and closing line.

Poem of the Week: Soliloquy of the Spanish Cloister by Robert Browning | Books | The Guardian