Deontological argument

Kant pursues this project through the first two chapters of the Groundwork.

Deontological argument

Patient-centered Agent-centered vs Patient-centered[ edit ] All deontological ethical theories are divided into agent-centered and patient-centered.

One popular example of an agent-centered theory is Divine command theorythe theory that morality is whatever God says it is. In Divine command theory, that duty is to God.

In Kantianism, that duty is to the Categorical imperativea chosen moral code that one believes should be universally applied. Duty to a social contract means obedience to rules consensually agreed to and democratically amended.

Arguments for[ edit ] One argument for deontological ethics is that, unlike consequentialism, it is morally undemanding and its laws are absolute and largely non-negotiable, which makes it very easy to live a normal life while still adhering to the philosophy.

Deontological ethics is also more enforceable because there are clear violations of duty which will be punished by whoever has been wronged, or, in theory, by God. Hence deontologists are known for a disdain, or even total refusal of compromise, summed up with "let justice be done though the heavens fall.

As such, a cause is restricted to its effect, while an effect is not restricted to one cause. That means, we can judge an effect by its cause, but we cannot judge a cause by its effects.

Likewise, we can judge an act by its intentions, but not by its effects.

Deontological Ethics (Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy)

Arguments against[ edit ] Deontology is often criticized for its support of unbending obedience at the expense of the original intent of the rules. Often times, duty can lead people to do terribly irrational or immoral things, while consequentialism is far less likely to.

Rules often contradict each other, especially in Divine command theorywhich leads to the creation of a subjective hierarchy of duties. Reductio ad absurdum of deontology leads to conclusions where deontologists would actually allow any number of horrible things to happen in the name of rigid morality.According to this argument, duties, and obligations set forth in deontological systems are actually those actions which have been demonstrated over long periods of time to have the best consequences.

Eventually, they become enshrined in custom and law. Indeed, each of the branches of deontological ethics—the agent-centered, the patient-centered, and the contractualist—can lay claim to being Kantian.

Deontological argument essays

The agent-centered deontologist can cite Kant's locating the moral quality of acts in the principles or maxims on which the agent acts and not primarily in those acts' effects on others. Runworkercompleted argument essay should gay marriage be legalised in australia essay personal essays buzzfeed quizzes.

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In moral philosophy, deontological ethics or deontology (from Greek δέον, deon, "obligation, duty") is the normative ethical theory that the morality of an action should be based on whether that action itself is right or wrong under a series of rules, rather than based on the consequences of the action.

Deontological argument

In moral philosophy, deontological ethics or deontology (from Greek δέον, deon, "obligation, duty") is the normative ethical theory that the morality of an action should be based on whether that action itself is right or wrong under a series of rules, rather than based on the consequences of the action.

Feb 23,  · But a powerful argument for the deontological reading is Kant’s own apparent insistence that the authority of moral demands must come simply from their being the demands of a rational will, quite apart from the value that will may have (see Schneewind .

Deontological ethics - RationalWiki